Resources and Talent ID Video Series

Golf Canada seeks to provide more player development support for promising junior golfers at younger ages through the newly created Talent Identification layer of the Team Canada system.

Under the leadership of Tristan Mullally as the National Head of Talent Identification, Golf Canada is working to coordinate with provincial associations, junior golf coaches and parents to provide player development support for promising junior golfers at younger ages.

The Talent ID Video Series is intended as a resource for parents and coaches of players on the competitive pathway between the approximate ages of 10-14 years old. The series covers five topics that Golf Canada believes are important for the parents and coaches of competitive players to consider. Each video features Team Canada women’s mental performance coach Lindsay Berard alongside national team coaches and players sharing their experiences. Additionally, each video comes with three accompanying PDF resources with practical tools and further information.

When Should My Kid Specialize?

Deciding when the time is right to specialize can be a difficult decision for both parents and athletes. This decision might come naturally to some, and others might find it quite challenging. Golf Canada’s Chief Sport Officer Kevin Blue and former LPGA member Augusta James share information to help parents and coaches understand the realities of specialization for young golfers.

  • Parent Resource

    Deciding when your child should specialize in sport is an important question every sport family comes to at some point.

    SUPPORT FOR PARENTS

  • Coach Resource

    Discover which items coaches should consider to help their athlete think about specialization in golf.

    SUPPORT FOR COACHES

  • Deeper Dive

    If you’re finding it difficult to navigate this, complete this tool to work through the problem solving processes in more detail.

    STEP BY STEP PROCESS

Mental Health Matters

Unlike an injury or physical pain that tends to be easier to recognize and rehabilitate, mental health can sometimes feel more complicated. Many parents and coaches are unsure of how to support their athlete’s mental health due to a lack of knowledge and understanding of the topic. As a parent or coach, it is okay for you not to have all the answers! You can start by building an understanding of mental health as it relates to what you see, hear, and experience when being around your athlete. Golf Canada’s mental performance coach Lindsay Berard speaks with Team Canada’s men’s head coach Derek Ingram on the importance of supporting athletes with their mental health.

“It’s important to make sure that our athletes are okay, and they’re happy both on the golf course and off.”

Derek Ingram, Head Coach Team Canada – Men
  • Parent Resource

    Understanding mental health is essential in supporting your child’s peak athletic performance.

    SUPPORT FOR PARENTS

  • Coach Resource

    When connecting with athletes, there is no one right answer! An individualized approach works best.

    SUPPORT FOR COACHES

  • Deeper Dive

    Supporting athletes with their mental health is key to improving their performance, enjoyment of the sport, and longevity in golf.

    STEP BY STEP PROCESS

Should I Coach My Kid?

Parents may consider taking one or several roles during an athlete’s journey (e.g., technical coach, emotional support, caddy, scheduling/management, etc.). As an athlete continues to develop and becomes more skilled in their sport, there comes a time when a parent’s role might change in terms of their training involvement. Knowing that most parents will pass the torch off to another coach at some point or another, it leaves the question; how can I support my athlete even if I’m not their coach? National Head of Talent Identification Tristan Mullally offers perspective on how parents can find a role that best suits their athlete’s development and former LPGA member Augusta James shares how her parents helped her to be her best.

  • Parent Resource

    A parent’s role in their child’s golf journey might change over time. Learn when and how to pass the torch.

    SUPPORT FOR PARENTS

  • Coach Resource

    For coaches, balancing and managing relationships with athletes and their parents is an essential part of the job.

    SUPPORT FOR COACHES

  • Deeper Dive

    The best way to work together includes understanding the human and growing through continual feedback.

    STEP BY STEP PROCESS

Don’t Make it Easy on Your Kid

It can be difficult to watch your athlete struggle and feel the need to protect your athlete so they don’t have to experience the hardest parts of striving in a sport they love. But what if jumping in and avoiding the hurt is actually taking away a valuable opportunity for your athlete? When we think about preparing athletes for the next level, it’s not just the swing and technique that matters, it’s also about their ability to control their emotions, recover from mistakes and manage tough moments. Team Canada men’s head coach Derek Ingram and former LPGA member Brittany Marchand discuss the importance of athletes developing self-reliance and learning to deal with adversity, and how their parents and coaches can help.

  • Parent Resource

    Help your athlete learn from their struggles and work towards developing long-term resilience.

    SUPPORT FOR PARENTS

  • Coach Resource

    Discover ways that coaches can create a safe and motivating environment for athletes who struggle.

    SUPPORT FOR COACHES

  • Deeper Dive

    Use this six step guide to navigate through difficult times with athletes and learn from the process.

    STEP BY STEP PROCESS

The Ride Home

Golf is not a linear sport. Supporting an athlete through the highs and lows of the game may feel difficult at times. There is no script or one best answer on how to approach an athlete, but there are some things you can keep in mind as you debrief a round and work through challenges. How you handle these moments will determine whether they continue to engage, open up about what is really going on, or if they are willing to come to you for support in the future. NextGen Assistant Coach and former LPGA member Jennifer Ha discusses how parents and coaches can mindfully support their athletes, and Korn Ferry Tour member Stuart Macdonald speaks to how his family helped him on his golf journey.

“Even though it’s so tempting to jump in and let them know what you saw, let your child do the talking. They will learn way more this way and increase their self-awareness.”

Jennifer Ha, Team Canada – NextGen Assistant Coach and former LPGA Golfer
  • Parent Resource

    Be mindful of the messages you are sending to your athlete and understand the important role of being their parent first.

    SUPPORT FOR PARENTS

  • Coach Resource

    Intentional conversations following a performance can support athletes in their journey.

    SUPPORT FOR COACHES

  • Deeper Dive

    Learn additional strategies to continue the conversation around performance in a constructive way.

    STEP BY STEP PROCESS